Vasectomy message boards…are they helpful? Well…yes and no.

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Online themes focus on relaying personal experience or to obtain information on expectations after vasectomy.

I was told by a lawn management consultant that the soccer field I was trying to improve was of the “Heinz 57” variety. In other words a mixture of many types of grass and weeds. Decision making in medicine, and having a vasectomy and who will do it,  is often the result of the accumulation of a hodgepodge of information.

I have told my prostate caner patients for years to learn from the internet, friends, family, books and yes…wait for it…your doctor to arrive at a decision about your medical care that is best for you. Getting a vasectomy is no different. So…take what you get from others, all others, with a proverbial grain of salt!  J.M.

Background: Patients are increasingly utilizing the internet to gain knowledge and information about disease states and treatments.

Objective: To identify common themes and usages of online message boards focused on vasectomy.

Design: Review of online content from patients.

Methods: Using the search term “vasectomy,” internet discussion boards were identified. The 3 discussion boards with the most posts were selected for investigation. An iterative and structured analysis process was undertaken to determine common themes.

Results: 129 posts from the 3 message boards were examined. The 2 most common topics were changes in sexual function after vasectomy and pain after vasectomy. Changes in sexual function included a variety of concerns including unexpected genital or sexual issues arising after vasectomy. Declines in sexual drive, erection quality, and orgasmic or ejaculatory changes were described. Posts relating to pain around vasectomy discussed concerns related to a “normal” amount of postprocedural pain or how to manage pain after vasectomy. Other topics included planning for postvasectomy care, potential issues after vasectomy, and feelings about a vasectomy. Overall, online content roughly divided into 2 uses – sharing personal experiences regarding vasectomy and to get information about what to expect, and how to manage issues that may arise after vasectomy. Medical provider input was not seen, and while some factual content was identified, personal opinion was more common.

Conclusions: Internet message boards on vasectomy focus on information exchange and personal experience. Factual content is limited, and medical provider input is uncommon.

Reviewer’s Comments: This is an interesting study that analyzes how men use the internet to discuss vasectomy. I am generally positive on patients using the internet to gain a functional knowledge of medical conditions if they are open to additional education during our visit. The use here of patients being able to relate to other men either before or after their vasectomy is a benefit as this personal type of interaction is not part of the usual patient-physician interaction. Online message board content is of course subject to the patients who decide to post and may be skewed by patients with poor outcomes. The aforesaid findings can potentially help providers counsel patients on expectations after vasectomy.(Reviewer–Charles Welliver, MD).

Article Reviewed: A Thematic Analysis of Online Discussion Boards for Vasectomy. Samplaski MK: Urology; 2018;111 (January): 32-38.

Did you know? Dr. McHugh is in Top 5% of urologists performing vasectomies in the U.S.

From Amino, Inc.

How does Amino determine Dr. McHugh’s vasectomy experience?

To give you an overview of Dr. McHugh’s practice experience, we show you how his practice compares to other doctors nationwide.

To determine Dr. McHugh’s experience treating vasectomy patients, we use our database of over 9 billion doctor-patient interactions. In our database, we look at every doctor who is a family practitioner, urologist, or surgeon, because these are the specialties that our data shows are most likely to treat vasectomy patients.

From this group of doctors, we rank doctors nationwide by the number of vasectomy patients they treated from 2014–2018. We give Dr. McHugh a badge if we have enough data to determine that he is among the top-ranked doctors for vasectomy, meaning he sees a lot of vasectomy patients compared to other doctors.

For vasectomy, Dr. McHugh has a top 5% badge, because he treated more vasectomy patients than 95% of similar doctors nationwide for 2014–2018.

We determine which of Dr. McHugh’s patients receive vasectomy by looking at the medical billing codes that appear on the electronic health insurance claims from their interactions with Dr. McHugh. Because there are tens of thousands of unique medical billing codes used to describe different types of health care interactions, Amino groups billing codes that describe similar health conditions or services into a single category that we display on our website with a user-friendly name (e.g. “diabetes”, “asthma”, “knee replacement”).

We count each distinct patient only once for any given reason for visit, but the same patient may be counted toward multiple reasons for visit if Dr. McHugh treated that patient for multiple reasons.

Know someone considering a vasectomy? A 101 Vasectomy primer of “A vasectomy through pictures!”

The pictures are graphic and show actual pictures of a vasectomy.

Scheduling a vasectomy is easy. We make a point to make your experience comfortable and hopefully pleasant. Using the contact form a consultation can be made 24-7 or one can call 770-535-0001 ext 113 and Kathy Burton will streamline the process. Do you have a burning question about having a vasectomy? You also can ask us questions by utilizing the contact form below or visiting Vasectomy.com. Dr. McHugh answers vasectomy questions from all over the U.S.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gettin neutered vs. gettin fixed-there’s a difference.

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Did you know?

  • When a male dog is neutered he is having his testicles removed.
  • Testosterone and sperm are produced in the testicles, however only sperm goes out through the vas deferns.
  • Although produced in the testicles, testosterone goes out into the body through the blood system.
  • So…a vasectomy, which severs and occludes the vas tubes, prevents sperm from being in the ejaculate and does not affect the testosterone level.
  • Tell that to your friends at work who, upon hearing that you are having a vasectomy, that no, you won’t be having a voice like a girl. Now you know why.
  • After a vasectomy you are infertile, not impotent.
  • Because the testosterone remains the same you have no change in your libido.
  • It takes about 30 ejaculations to clear the vas tube of sperm beyond the vasectomy site so you will be advised to use protection until the urologist confirms the absence of sperm by microscopic evaluation or a home kit called spermcheck.com which can be ordered online.

In case you have other questions…below is an informative and slightly humorous podcast by Dr. McHugh entitled Vasectomy 101 (Everything you wanted to know but were afraid to ask.)

Considering a vasectomy?  Contact us for a consultation. We have special pricing for patients with a high deductible as well as those who are self-pay.

Common question: Does a vasectomy cause prostate cancer?

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Vasectomy Not Associated With Prostate Cancer

Urology – February 28, 2009 – Vol. 25 – No. 04

There is no association between prostate cancer and age at vasectomy or years since vasectomy.

Article Reviewed: Vasectomy and the Risk of Prostate Cancer. Holt SK, Salinas CA, Stanford JL: J Urol; 2008;180 (December): 2565-2568.

Background: The majority of the literature now has shown no association between vasectomy and prostate cancer. The effect of vasectomy on men with a family history of prostate cancer or on those who underwent a vasectomy at a young age or had an extended period of time since the procedure has been poorly studied due to small sample sizes and short study follow-up.

Objective: To assess the risk of prostate cancer in men by age and length of time to exposure from vasectomy to disease.

Design: Population-based, prostate cancer case-controlled study.

Participants: 1327 men aged 35 to 74 years residing in King County, Washington, with a diagnosis of prostate cancer.

Methods: Cases of prostate cancer were identified from the SEER database for this population. Structured in-person interviews were conducted. Eligible controls were identified by random digit telephone dialing. Analysis based on prostate cancer Gleason score and stage was performed. Analysis was also performed based on demographics, age, prostate cancer screening history (within the last 5 years), family history of prostate cancer, and vasectomy parameters.

Results: 1327 men were eligible for study from the SEER database; 1001 completed the personal questionnaire. In total, 1340 controls were identified, of which 942 were interviewed. The control population showed that men who had undergone vasectomy were older, white, married, non-smokers with higher income and education, and had undergone PSA screening. Of men with prostate cancer and controls, 36% had undergone a vasectomy. Mean number of years since vasectomy in cases and controls was 21.1 years. No significant association was seen between prostate cancer and vasectomy status, age at vasectomy, years since vasectomy, or year of vasectomy. There was no evidence of risk estimates across vasectomy parameters. Risk did not change if men with prostate cancer within 2 years of vasectomy and controls with no PSA screening within 5 years (n=136) were excluded.

Conclusions:

No association was found between prostate cancer and vasectomy, even in men who had a vasectomy performed at a young age or had an extended period of time since vasectomy.

Reviewer’s Comments: This paper is a well-conducted, large case-control study that answers the concern about possible limitations of previous work that reported the lack of association between prostate cancer and vasectomy. This criticism often indicated inadequate follow-up since vasectomy to make this claim. In this study, average time since vasectomy in cases of prostate cancer and controls was 21 years. Multiple variables were looked at including vasectomy in the face of prostate cancer family history and screening. This large study should end the criticism on previous work that did not answer the question of prostate cancer and time from vasectomy. (Reviewer–Ajay K. Nangia, MBBS).

 

Questions about a Vasectomy? Here’s a resource.

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Dr. McHugh answers vasectomy questions from patients all over the USA on vasectomy.com. If you click on the link below and then click on Q and A you’ll be directed to all of the questions he’s answered over the years. The site breaks down the categories to help navigate to a particular area of concern. If you have a vasectomy question you can post it on vasectomy.com under “Ask the Doctor” and the likelihood is that Dr. McHugh will be asked to answer it. Give it a whirl!

 Vasectomy.com 

Remember to then click on Q and A to get the archives of Dr. McHugh’s answers.

How common is it for the male to want to reverse a vasectomy?

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Predictive factors for vasectomy include income, number of biologic children, access to care, education level, religion, and race.

Article Reviewed: Vasectomy Demographics and Postvasectomy Desire for Future Children: Results From a Contemporary National Survey. Sharma V, Le BV, et al: Fertil Steril; 2013;99 (June): 1880-1885.

Background: Nearly half a million men choose vasectomy each year. Having a clear understanding of which men undergo a vasectomy can help improve counseling and possibly provide guidance to increase acceptance in those not currently seeking vasectomy. Additionally, because the rate of desire for subsequent fertility is often calculated from men presenting for vasectomy reversal consultations, this may underestimate the numbers.

Objective: To determine the demographic factors of men choosing vasectomy and to define the number of men subsequently desiring fertility post-vasectomy.

Design: Analysis of National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG).

Methods: The NSFG was conducted from June 2006 to June 2010 and sampled 10,403 men aged 15 to 45 years. Participants were questioned by female interviewers and compensated $40. Using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention methodology, the 110 diverse sampling units were adjusted based on census data to estimate national results.

Results: 8992 men aged ≥18 years were surveyed and 368 had a vasectomy during this time frame. This corresponds to a prevalence of 6.6%, markedly lower than the tubal ligation prevalence of 16.4% in women for the same age ranges. White men were more likely to have undergone vasectomy, with a prevalence of 9.1%. Black men and Hispanics had a prevalence of 2.4% and 2.1%, respectively. Other factors increasing the prevalence of vasectomy included income, education level, access to health care, and U.S. born (compared to immigrants). In total, 84% of the men had at least 2 children and 21% of men who were adoptive fathers had a vasectomy. The overall strongest predictor was number of biologic children. Overall, 19% of men who had undergone vasectomy desired future children and this was more likely when men belonged to a religion. Only 2% of men had undergone a vasectomy reversal.

Conclusions: Predictive factors for vasectomy include number of biologic children, race, and access to care. Nearly 1 in 5 of these men desired subsequent fertility.

Reviewer’s Comments: These data match my general perception of the typical male presenting to my office for vasectomy consultation. It is interesting to see that black men and Hispanic men do not pursue vasectomy as often and this may be an area for growth if cultural concerns can be addressed. Most interesting in this manuscript is the fact that 1 in 5 men desire subsequent fertility. I am curious if some of the men described as adoptive fathers were in this group. I believe counseling on the option of vasectomy reversal or in vitro fertilization is important during the vasectomy visit so men realize there are options, but the cost of these procedures should also be discussed. It would also be interesting to see if the same demographics are seen in countries with universal health care and limited access issues.(Reviewer–Gregory Lowe, MD).