Vasectomy Top Questions? We’ve got answers.

Click for link to Google My Business questions Dr. McHugh has answered.

Vasectomy 101 by Dr. McHugh

Dr. McHugh’s eBook-All you’d want to know about a vasectomy but your wife forgot to ask!

More questions? Use the Vasectomy contact form on the contact page to contact us regarding information or scheduling.

Vasectomy? Most common question.

The misconception is that since a vasectomy is performed near the testicles, that it will affect testosterone.

Will a vasectomy affect my sex life?

A vasectomy only removes sperm from the ejaculate. It has no effect on serum testosterone.

So, men will have to come up with another “objection” for taking the “plunge” that is the decision to consent to scheduling the procedure.

Post vasectomy job number 1!

It ain’t over…until we say it’s over!

John McHugh M.D.

Once the vasectomy procedure is over and you are well on your way to full recovery, the next important thing to remember is , “No unprotected sex until there is proof there are no residual sperm in the ejaculate.”

Many patients feel that the time from the vasectomy is the factor that influences sterility, however it is the number of ejaculations. It usually requires 20-30 ejaculations to achieve sterility (i.e. no sperm).

You can use in certain cases the test kit available from spermcheck.com, however at Northeast Georgia Urological Associates we personally evaluate each post vasectomy specimen under a microscope at no additional charge.

How your anticipated urologist plans to handle the evaluation of your specimen, the cost if any, how it is done, may be one of the factors that should determine who performs your vasectomy.

We’ve done thousands, we offer conscious sedation (absolutely painless), accept most all insurances and offer fair all inclusive pricing for self pay patients.

Give us a call-we will take good care of you.

Thank you!

Top notch facility, staff, and doctor. Everything went smoothly and the staff and doctor made me feel comfortable from start to finish. Highly recommended!

A.V.-Microscopic Vasectomy Reversal

Contact us for no needle vasectomy or microscopic vasectomy reversal.

Same tube but different operation!

A common question is “Is the vasectomy procedure like a vasectomy reversal?”

Well, a vasectomy takes about 15 minutes and done through a small “grain of rice” opening.

A reversal is done using an operating microscope and takes about 2 hours to perform usually through two small openings. Due to the time of the procedure there is more swelling and bruising.

So, in fact they are not similar but both are done through the scrotum and on the same structure. It is a fair question and it is important that the patient consenting to a reversal know the difference. It is a question I answer with each reversal phone consultation.

Considering a vasectomy or reversal? Just google:”McHugh”

McHugh Vasectomy-All you’d need to know.

Click here for post on “All you’d ever want to know about a vasectomy.”

Vasectomy…oh happy days!

Talk about options for having a vasectomy…

  1. No needle No scalpel vasectomy done in the office with pre-procedure medications (sedative and pain pill).
  2. Special fair pricing for self-pay
  3. Special fair pricing for high deductible
  4. We accept most all major insurances-if we are out of network with yours we’ll still try to work with you and try to match their benefits as we were in network!
  5. I.V. general anesthesia for the patient who prefers being “asleep” and just waking up and its over!
  6. A vasectomy can be done any day of the week-I.V. anesthesia on Tuesday or Thursdays.
  7. One small “grain of rice” sized opening.
  8. We’ve done a “whole bunch” of vasectomies in our 30 plus years of doing vasectomies.

“Dr. McHugh is in the top 5% of physicians who see vasectomy patients in the U.S. 2014-1018.” -Amino. com, inc. 

Vasectomy message boards…are they helpful? Well…yes and no.

img_1268
Online themes focus on relaying personal experience or to obtain information on expectations after vasectomy.

I was told by a lawn management consultant that the soccer field I was trying to improve was of the “Heinz 57” variety. In other words a mixture of many types of grass and weeds. Decision making in medicine, and having a vasectomy and who will do it,  is often the result of the accumulation of a hodgepodge of information.

I have told my prostate caner patients for years to learn from the internet, friends, family, books and yes…wait for it…your doctor to arrive at a decision about your medical care that is best for you. Getting a vasectomy is no different. So…take what you get from others, all others, with a proverbial grain of salt!  J.M.

Background: Patients are increasingly utilizing the internet to gain knowledge and information about disease states and treatments.

Objective: To identify common themes and usages of online message boards focused on vasectomy.

Design: Review of online content from patients.

Methods: Using the search term “vasectomy,” internet discussion boards were identified. The 3 discussion boards with the most posts were selected for investigation. An iterative and structured analysis process was undertaken to determine common themes.

Results: 129 posts from the 3 message boards were examined. The 2 most common topics were changes in sexual function after vasectomy and pain after vasectomy. Changes in sexual function included a variety of concerns including unexpected genital or sexual issues arising after vasectomy. Declines in sexual drive, erection quality, and orgasmic or ejaculatory changes were described. Posts relating to pain around vasectomy discussed concerns related to a “normal” amount of postprocedural pain or how to manage pain after vasectomy. Other topics included planning for postvasectomy care, potential issues after vasectomy, and feelings about a vasectomy. Overall, online content roughly divided into 2 uses – sharing personal experiences regarding vasectomy and to get information about what to expect, and how to manage issues that may arise after vasectomy. Medical provider input was not seen, and while some factual content was identified, personal opinion was more common.

Conclusions: Internet message boards on vasectomy focus on information exchange and personal experience. Factual content is limited, and medical provider input is uncommon.

Reviewer’s Comments: This is an interesting study that analyzes how men use the internet to discuss vasectomy. I am generally positive on patients using the internet to gain a functional knowledge of medical conditions if they are open to additional education during our visit. The use here of patients being able to relate to other men either before or after their vasectomy is a benefit as this personal type of interaction is not part of the usual patient-physician interaction. Online message board content is of course subject to the patients who decide to post and may be skewed by patients with poor outcomes. The aforesaid findings can potentially help providers counsel patients on expectations after vasectomy.(Reviewer–Charles Welliver, MD).

Article Reviewed: A Thematic Analysis of Online Discussion Boards for Vasectomy. Samplaski MK: Urology; 2018;111 (January): 32-38.

Vasectomy vs. tubal ligation-Which is more common?

The prevalence of vasectomy was 6.6% (compared with a tubal ligation prevalence of 16.35%).

Many factors, including social, medical, and unknown reasons, contribute to the decision of a couple to proceed with one form or another of surgical sterilization.

Objective: To describe the demographics and family planning attitudes of vasectomized men.

Design: Retrospective cohort analysis of National Survey for Family Growth data collected through the National Center for Health Statistics between June 2006 and June 2010.

Methods: The survey sampled 10,403 men from various urban and rural communities, aged 15 to 45 years, regarding family planning attitudes. These sampled statistics could be extrapolated to provide a reasonably accurate national survey portrait.

Results: The prevalence of vasectomy was 6.6% (compared with a tubal ligation prevalence of 16.35%). The odds ratios (OR) for having a vasectomy in this sample were: currently married 7.8; previously married 5.8; and increased age 1.1. The odds increased with increased number of biologic children. Examples of factors decreasing the odds of having a vasectomy were: immigrant status (OR 0.18); African American (OR 0.22); Hispanic (OR 0.054); or Catholic (OR 0.55). Also, this survey determined that 19.6% of vasectomized men expressed a desire for future children suggesting a higher than previously recognized prevalence of sterilization regret; yet only 1.9% of vasectomized men in the sample reported having a reversal.

Conclusions: Many factors, some social, some medical, some unknown, contribute to the decision of a couple to proceed with one form or another of surgical sterilization.

Reviewer’s Comments: As pointed out in this article, there are many factors that contribute to the decision to cease further childbearing. A permanent sterilization procedure is a popular choice, particularly among married couples. The demographic factors that tilt a couple towards tubal ligation or vasectomy are explored in this article, and the data promote lively speculation.(Reviewer–Berel Held, MD).

Article Reviewed: Vasectomy Demographics and Postvasectomy Desire for Future Children: Results From a Contemporary National Survey. Sharma V, Le BV, et al: Fertil Steril; 2013;99 (June): 1880-1885.